Archive for the ‘Shetland rams’ Category

Meet Roundabout Acres Costello

2009 Costello soft, soft fleece

2009 Costello soft, soft fleece

Costello face/horns March 2009

Costello face/horns March 2009

Roundabout Acres Costello was used this year for breeding our Shetland lambs.  I put the Shetland group together late so we still have one ewe yet to deliver.  (YIKES!  This is too late…I will never do that again!)  So far he has thrown spots, spots, spots.  He is an Ag, musket, bersugget smaller framed ram with a very pleasant, respectful personality.  His fleece is soft and lovely.  He wool was easily rooed (hand plucked) and very clean.  I am considering if I should sell him this year or use him again next.  I will wait until lamb evaluation is done at the end of the summer.

I snapped these photos when Costello was checking out his new lambs.  I thought he was looking different but I couldn’t figure what it was.  I saw the difference when I was looking through photos.  Do you see it?

Are those my lambs?

Are those my lambs?

Costello's face from the side.  His big boy horn sheath is growing in.

Costello's face from the side. His big boy horn sheath is growing in.

Costello  in winter 2009

Costello in winter 2009. His horn sheaths are just starting to grow.

Costello's fleece

Costello's fleece

Costello being rooed, March 2009.  He decided to drop to his knees when he had enough!

Costello being rooed, March 2009. He decided to drop to his knees when he had enough!

Costello 2009 hand rooed fleece

Costello 2009 hand rooed fleece

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Angus Rua (Gus the Red)

Last summer, I began looking for a herding breed of dog. As the flock grows, it is becoming more difficult to manage without the aid of a trained dog. Our preference was to adopt or re-home a dog. I have been following http://www.petfinder.com but the several dogs I was interested in never worked out. Well, as they say…when one door closes, another one opens…

We are now the proud new owners of a 6 year old Border Collie who has had training in herding sheep. He has a very gentle spirit and does have an “off button” while in the house. His former owner felt he needed to be on a farm to work and do what he does best. We feel fortunate that she decided he could live with us.
The above photo is Gus and his former mom showing us how he does his stuff. He was able to move the Shetland rams from a wide open, one-acre plus pasture to a pen several hundred yards away. Now I need to take herding lessons with him to keep him sharp and help me to learn how to work with him.

Gus has been very helpful the last few months. Sheep get out of their pens from time to time and he is great at working close and holding them so we can catch the woolly buggers. He has saved our backs on more than one occasion. He is a nice addition to our home. He loves face rubs and catching the ball with our black lab, Sylvan. And our cat is amused and entertained by his constant interest.

However, the llamas aren’t so sure about Gus or our Black Lab, Sylvan. One of the reasons we have the llamas is to help guard the sheep from canine predators. We have to be sure that the dogs don’t get into the same enclosure as the llamas. They may just try to stomp a dog to death. The llamas have learned that the dogs are part of our farm flock but their instincts would prevail and they would most likely protect the sheep.

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