I GROW WOOL but There IS A USE for Man-made Synthetic Fibers (via O ECOTEXTILES)

I love wool even though I am sensitive to the “itch” factor. I have learned to love the smell of lanolin when washing fleece. My hands like that soft feeling of the grease in the water when a fleece is soaking. And picking, carding, spinning, plying, weaving or knitting are lovely tactile pleasures.

BFL X NCC Mule fiber

Happily, we knitters and spinners have a wealth of natural, renewable fiber to choose from – the many types of sheep’s wool, llama, alpaca, mohair, yak, bison, cotton, linen, silk, qiviut, even dog hair! So many fibers — so little time.  Sigh…

Having said that, I have happy for a lightweight, rip-stop nylon tent that sheds water when camping in a rainstorm. Also, a breathable rain jacket is a vast improvement over the inexpensive plastic raincoats that leave me more drenched in sweat than rain! And thankfully, our police officers and troops are protected daily by Kevlar vests which will stop a bullet.  Having said that, if set on fire, wool will self-extinguish;  synthetic fibers will melt onto one’s skin.

So there is a place and use for synthetic fibers. But production of any fiber comes at a cost to the environment. Scouring natural fiber involves water, soap/detergent and vinegar. With synthetic fibers, I never really thought about the oil and chemicals involved in the manufacturing process. Thank you again to the ladies of O Ecotextiles for their excellent information!

Man-made synthetic fibers For millennia mankind depended on the natural world to supply its fiber needs.  But scientists, as a result of extensive research, were able to replicate naturally occurring animal and plant fibers by creating fibers from synthetic chemicals. In the literature, it is often noted that there are three kinds of man-made fibers: those made by “transformation of natural polymers” (also called regenerated cellulosics), those made from synthetic polymer … Read More

via O ECOTEXTILES

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